The #1 factor for a child to thrive is the presence of a caring, stable adult.

More than 60 percent of kids in the U.S. have been exposed to crime, abuse, and violence in their homes, schools, and communities.

Childhood exposure to violence has real, tangible, and detrimental impacts on our children. A child’s exposure to one type of violence increases the likelihood that the child will be exposed to other types of violence and exposed multiple times.

With the help of caring and supportive adults, children affected by violence can recover and thrive. Get to know the kids who live in your neighborhood. Wave hello. Start conversations.

Every child in Multnomah County matters—make them feel like it.

EVERY CHILD IN MULTNOMAH COUNTY MATTERS.
BE AN ADULT THEY CAN TRUST. BE PART OF THE SOLUTION.

  • Family

  • Neighbors

  • Social Services
  • Educators

  • Health Services

FAMILY & FRIENDS

Last year, nearly 10,000 children in Multnomah County were exposed to domestic violence.

Support from a safe, nurturing caregiver who understands their child’s developmental needs is one of the best ways that children exposed to violence can heal.

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NEIGHBORS

In the United States, more than 46 million kids experience trauma and violence every year—greater than the populations of Florida, New York, and Wisconsin combined.

Connected neighborhoods, where people feel a sense of place and belonging, can prevent childhood exposure to violence. Be an active member of your community!

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SOCIAL SERVICES PROVIDERS

Research shows there are effective interventions for children who experience trauma.

Concrete support in times of need can help families be resilient in the face of violence and trauma.

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EDUCATORS

Young children who are exposed to five or more adverse experiences—such as neglect, abuse, household violence, or substance abuse— in the first three years of their lives face a 75% likelihood of having one or more delays in language, emotional, or brain development.

For youth who may not have experienced many other positive relationships with adults, the student-teacher bond can be very important. Educators who listen and are dependable can offer their students stability and an opportunity to be heard.

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HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

A recent study found that low-income children who are exposed to violence are at greater risk than their peers of having allergies, asthma, gastrointestinal problems, headaches, and flu.

Strong attachment with caregivers in early childhood can help children recover from stress and trauma. Encourage parents to read to and be present with their children to promote healing.

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be part of defending childhood in multnomah county
Contact Us

Erin Fairchild

erin.fairchild@multco.us (503) 988-4995
This Web site is funded through a grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).